Daisy – A Movie that Mystifies your Mind Magically

Daisy, Daisy, give me your answer true. The answer being, what does one do when they’re struggling with a bad case of writer’s block? It sometimes leads to hilarious results, or even surreal moments. But in reality, writer’s block is the biggest struggle for a writer. Admittedly, I’ve been struggling myself lately. No joke.

No film ever captures the stress in a more realistic manner than this short film written and directed by VFS student Santiago Vazquez Gayton. Starring Alex Pepin as George, a writer who spends his summer at a cabin coming up with ideas for his story. But it takes so long to get proper inspiration and since the corporation doesn’t like his original idea, he can’t come up with something easily enough. George takes out his stress on a set of wind chimes (first time I’ve seen something like that), and tries to calm himself down after a heated phone call. One day during a writing session, George goes into the woods for some more inspiration and discovers a mysterious box. Upon opening it, it seems like the universe has changed, and he encounters a young girl (Olga Petsa) dressed like a forest princess. The young girl becomes interested with George and constantly interrupts his writing sessions until he finally heads out to a darker part of the woods he never explored before. It is there that George discovers a younger more simpler time in his life, when things were much more different back then. But as he explores his long lost youth, he gets so encased in it, but will it take him away from the present, or will he able to create a new story from the inspiration he has discovered?

An extremely beautiful film, Daisy takes the viewer on a magical journey starting out as a stress inducing non-fiction and turning into a fun-filled fantasy. The story may not seem like much, but it’s the visuals and the imagination put into it that truly make it stand out. The characters are well written and well played, expressing emotion that adds to the mystical feel. The music isn’t much, but it’s so beautiful and soothing, it relaxes the mind’s viewer, taking them further into that easygoing headspace. With the use of the small amounts of bright colours in the dark forest, and the astounding sight of George’s room, it really changes things. I see a lot of short films as a reviewer, but I never see them change moods as evenly as this one. That’s the truth. It’s sure to be a hit at film festivals worldwide.

 

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